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FEATURE

STYLE ICONS: PINK FLOYD

By Matt Glazebrook, May 14, 2017

The V&A’s new blockbuster Pink Floyd exhibition — Their Mortal Remains — opens with a quote from John Peel testifying to the band’s unassuming look: "They could have joined the audience at one of their own gigs without being recognized." But while any sartorial statements took a backseat to the group's other visual endeavours (arty Hipgnosis album covers, spectacular live shows), in their early years at least, they rolled with a certain low-key swagger.

pink floyd

Picture: Getty

Enigmatic singer Syd Barrett brought a peacocky frontman quality to the group’s original line-up, even as he recoiled from the spotlight. Floral-print shirts complemented the four-piece’s psychedelic sound and swirling light shows, while beads, dark curly locks, Sta-Prest flares and stack-heeled boots completed the '60s folk-rock pin-up vibe. Refresh the look for SS17 by pairing your statement button-up retro textures with contemporary cuts (wide-legged cord pants, for instance), or add a modern skate edge by layering a long-sleeved tee underneath.

pink floyd

Picture: Getty

Following Barrett’s withdrawal from the group, his friend and replacement David Gilmour assumed the "handsome guitarist with mystique" role. The '60s turned into the early '70s and cult success with acid-tinged folk evolved into unit-shifting, arena-filling, space rock. The clothes changed, too, with swinging London florals replaced by muted tones, skinny-fit T-shirts and worn-out denim. Shopped a few sizes larger, Pink Floyd's '70s tees wouldn't look out of place today. Pair a striped top in retro shades (mustard, copper, burgundy, chocolate) with simple straight-cut stonewashed jeans or Dickie workpants to stop the look sliding into parody. And cancel that trip to the barber.

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